Top-Of-Key 3-Pointer

When a defense double-teams a ball handler, execute a quick pass to the screener and an extra pass to the relocating wing for an open 3-point try.

Many basketball teams today doubleteam the ball handler on a ball screen. This forces defenders to scramble. One extra pass allows for an open 3-pointer.

In its overtime victory over Butler last month, Villanova ran this play to perfection to start the extra session. In typical Jay Wright style, four players are located outside the 3-point arc.

The point guard passes to the wing and relocates to the opposite wing. The player at the top of the key moves into position to set a ball screen for the wing [1]. The wing dribbles left off the ball screen and draws two defenders with him. The screener continues moving away from the ball and receives a quick pass. The point guard sets a screen for the left wing, who is moving toward the top of the set [2]. As the defense scrambles to cover the ball on the right wing, the left wing now has hands ready at the top of the set. A pass is made and the shooter knocks down the open 3-pointer [3].

3-pointer play

Scout the opposition prior to the game and even ingame to see if the defensive tendency is to run a double team at the dribbler when receiving a ball screen.

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