Let Them Land, Keep Elbows In

The intentional-foul rule has changed with referees keeping a closer eye on how defensive players close out and controlling swinging elbows when securing possession

WHY USE IT
Once again, physical play has pushed it way into basketball much more during recent years. High school players now must provide a jump shooter space to land when in the act of shooting. Plus, the swinging of elbows to fend of defenders will not be tolerated, so your players need to figure out how to not place the official in a position to call an intentional foul.

SET UP
There are three easy drills to help player curtail the possibility of committing an intentional foul under the new rule wording.

HOW TO PLAY
The first drill has a coach throwing a ball into an open area with two players going after it. Once the ball is secured, the ball handler establishes position without swinging elbows [1]. The second drill has the coach passing to a shooter and a defender closing out without undercutting the elevated shooter [2]. The third has two players battling for a rebound but not throwing elbows to gain space or separation [3].

BCW39_image3

TECHNIQUE
If players do commit a foul under the new rules, stop play and explain to everyone why a referee may call an intentional foul in that instance.